I would like to see it. I’d Like to See It by Norman Fischer

I like to see it lap the Miles

I would like to see it

After descending a hill, it stops at the terminal like a horse before its barn door. Railroad depot right in , 1837 Helen Vendler points out that the railroad as a symbol of progress was not an uncommon subject for literature in 19th century America, and indicates Dickinson's father a lawyer was instrumental in bringing the railroad to their hometown of. It is a blight on the natural world, taking on its more negative characteristics and combining them with too much power. So while the speaker claims to like watching this spectacle, she certainly does not like the creature itself, whether she likes the process of observing it or not. Bloom's How to Write about Emily Dickinson. Bloom indicates the poem is one of the very few in which Dickinson examined a current technology, and points out that its theme is the effect such a technology may have on the landscape and on people and animals. Dickinson gives the train agency in the poem—it laps, it licks, it feeds itself, it crawls—and emotions—it is supercilious, it complains.

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Emily Dickinson’s Collected Poems “I like to see it lap the Miles

I would like to see it

And although the speaker says she likes to watch it do all of these things, her tone and diction belie this statement. In doing so, she is not just complicating the riddle, she is creating an implicit comparison between this train and all the creatures of the natural world that actually do feed themselves, crawl, complain. The poem was first published in 1891. By describing it in the language of the natural world, she creates a striking juxtaposition between it and that world. The station was situated not far from the Dickinson Homestead on Main Street, and the reclusive Dickinson attended its opening, watching alone from the woods. Poems by Emily Dickinson: Second Series.

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I’d Like to See It by Norman Fischer

I would like to see it

. The Cambridge Companion to Emily Dickinson. Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries. The Poems of Emily Dickinson: Reading Edition. Criticism of the poem is varied, Vendler observes. . .

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I like to see it lap the Miles

I would like to see it

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Emily Dickinson’s Collected Poems “I like to see it lap the Miles

I would like to see it

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I’d Like to See It by Norman Fischer

I would like to see it

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